Q&A with Justin Daigle, renowned yearbook advisor

Justin+Daigle+stands+with+his+EIC%27s+after+their+year-end+banquet.+
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Q&A with Justin Daigle, renowned yearbook advisor

Justin Daigle stands with his EIC's after their year-end banquet.

Justin Daigle stands with his EIC's after their year-end banquet.

Justin Daigle stands with his EIC's after their year-end banquet.

Justin Daigle stands with his EIC's after their year-end banquet.

Rebecca Crook, Jakob Aggers, and Kathryn Juhasz

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Justin Daigle is the Yearbook advisor for Brighton high school in  He also works as the English Department chair and Avid Coordinator at Brighton in addition to teaching journalism classes. He’s worked there for 14 years. At Rocky Mountain Journalism Camp 2018, our staff got a chance to ask Daigle a few questions about his experience as an advisor as well as the path that he took to get to where he is today.

Q: What is your favorite part about being an advisor?

A: The best thing is having students find themselves within the program. For example, I’ve had a lot of students that didn’t realize they could be a leader; but they end up creating something that not only wins national awards but also receives a lot of recognition in our community.

Q: How many years have you worked at Brighton and what was your path like to get there?

A: I just finished my fourteenth year; I started when I was 21 and it was my first job. I went to CSU and I student taught at Horizon (beforehand). I interviewed with Brighton- I never even filled anything out at all. They told me “We’ll let you know Monday!” on that Friday; I went to my grandma’s and went to sleep that day and they called me letting me know I got the job. I couldn’t answer the phone since I was asleep and they left a message saying “will you please call us back” and I didn’t see it so I still had to wait all weekend.

Q: And what first inspired you to get into journalism? You also mentioned being on your high school’s student newspaper staff; what is your favorite memory from that?

A: My ninth grade english teacher said “you’re such a good writer! I recommended you for journalism.” I took the initial journalism class and quickly went into newspaper. I was a staff member for a couple months and then (my teacher) made me a copy editor right away. By junior year, I was the news editor; I was designing the front page and the news pages throughout the piece. We did this feature on skiing during my junior year up in Breckenridge and we profiled all these different resorts. This resort gave us free passes so the whole staff got to go and we just had to pay for the bus; It was the first time I had ever skied.

Q: How has your experience been at Rocky Mountain Journalism Camp over the past years? And how has this year been different or unique?

A: The thing that I like about RMJ is that we keep changing and evolving every year. I think what’s different about this year is that my staff came in a little more prepared. It’s not to say that my past years didn’t work hard, but it seemed like it really clicked this year and we really have gotten a lot done.

 

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